Nobel Prize in Economics 2019

The news of this year's Nobel laureate(s) in Economic Sciences was just an hour ago announced to be the economists Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer for their work to alleviate global poverty, the official announcement said. Hopefully, this will bring development economics back on the radar of mainstream economics and make the field … Continue reading Nobel Prize in Economics 2019

China and inequality

In many developing countries with a deeply rooted legacy of socialism and egalitarianism, debates about choosing between the policy preferences of economic growth, equality and social justice remain as contentious as ever. Within economics, unanimity is really never meant to be achieved when studying the following questions: What is the optimal tax rate? What is … Continue reading China and inequality

Emi Nakamura and #WomenInEconomics

On 2 May, it was announced that the economist, Emi Nakamura (Berkeley), had earned the John Bates Clark Medal, an annually-awarded prize which enjoys similar prestige among young American economists as the Yrjö Jahnsson Award does among young European economists. While myself being an enthusiastic follower of the "credibility revolution" within microeconomics - which can … Continue reading Emi Nakamura and #WomenInEconomics

Economics and “the market”

“Economics Now Points Away From the Laissez-Faire Approach”: A recent interview featuring the economist, Sureish Naidu, briefly summarized all the reasons why economics these days has a lot more to contribute to the policy world. Here's a few quotes to which I could directly relate to my own reflections and past experience with economics, being … Continue reading Economics and “the market”

Pro-social incentives and skills in the public sector

Yesterday was a fantastic day for applied microeconmists, and which further reminded me of the very reasons why I eventually seek to become one. The European Economic Association (EEA) announced that the 2019 Yrjö Jahnsson Award, a prestigious bi-annual prize awarded to European economists under the age of 45, went to Oriana Bandiera (LSE) and … Continue reading Pro-social incentives and skills in the public sector

Bo Songvisava, Thailand and cultural decay

A colleague of mine recently introduced me to “Chef’s Table”, a Netflix series documenting different world cuisines through stories of individual chefs and their chosen cuisine of specialization. The first episode that I watched featured Duangporn “Bo” Songvisava, a female Thai co-chef and owner of Bo.Lan, a Bangkok restaurant. This was not a random choice. … Continue reading Bo Songvisava, Thailand and cultural decay